Action

Corporate identity
& brand standards

A rigorously designed identity is essential to establishing and promoting your brand. A good system is good business.

Clear and consistent brand standards facilitate efficient marketing and communications by your team. Over time, adhering to these standards will also reinforce relationships with your customers, clients, partners, or supporters. 

“SYSTEM” IS THE OPERATIVE WORD

What’s included in a corporate identity system? A traditional, bare-bones system typically includes a logo package, business cards, envelopes, and letterhead. More complete systems might also include website and email standards, Word and PowerPoint templates, packaging, labels, bags, and apparel, or other branded accessories. These diverse elements must all be designed with a common vision and a guiding set of principles.

A corporate identity style guide might describe all of these items in detail, as well as typography recommendations, extended color palettes, and photography or illustration guidelines. The guide is essentially a user manual for your organization to move forward in a clear and systematic way with the identity system we’ve provided. Why guess how big the logo can be or which fonts to use when?

A brand standards system is even more comprehensive, extending well beyond the purely visual aspects of corporate identity to include all aspects of communication and audience engagement.

In addition to covering the visual elements of the corporate identity system, a good brand standards guide will include discussion of “brand pillars” such as vibe, purpose, mission, vision, belief or point of view, brand essence, and position, as well as specific messaging guidelines for usage of key words, phrases, taglines, and campaign slogans for various constituencies.

“I JUST WANT A LOGO.”

We will happily design a logo for you. But we will do so only in the context of a complete brand strategy and identity system. A logo created in isolation, with no basis in brand research or insights, or any anticipation of future applications and relationships, is just window dressing—a stopgap solution that’s unlikely to succeed in the long run. Who needs that?

Not you. Let’s do it right.